America? Damning Department of Defense report claims military needs 'immediate action' to beat hi-tech enemies

It is already changing the face of warface, with AI adversaries and electronic spies taking centre stage.

However, America has fallen catastrophically behind in the hi-tech battlefield, a new report has claimed.

The Defense Science Board's report into autonomy concluded 'there are both substantial operational benefits and potential perils associated with its use,' and called for immediate action.

Click here for the full report 

The Defense Science Board's report into autonomy concluded the DoD must accelerate its exploitation of autonomy to remain ahead of enemies.

The Defense Science Board's report into autonomy concluded the DoD must accelerate its exploitation of autonomy to remain ahead of enemies.

'This study concluded that DoD must accelerate its exploitation of autonomy—both to realize the potential military value and to remain ahead of adversaries who also will exploit its operational benefits.'

It says the problem had been seen decades ago - but nothing has been done. 

'For years, it has been clear that certain countries could, and most likely would, develop the technology and expertise to use cyber and electronic warfare against U.S. forces,' the study's authors wrote. 

'Yet most of the U.S. effort focused on developing offensive cyber capabilities without commensurate attention to hardening U.S. systems against attacks from others. 

'Unfortunately, in both domains, that neglect has resulted in DoD spending large sums of money today to 'patch' systems against potential attacks.'

The study advises intelligence agencies should 'raise the priority of collection and analysis of foreign autonomous systems.' 

It also called for a series of 'cyberwar games' to see potential problems and try to fight off AI systems.

It called for the Pentagon's office of acquisition technology and logistics to gather together a community of researchers to run tests and scenarios to discover 'counter-autonomy technologies, surrogates, and solutions' — in other words, practice fighting enemy AI systems. 

This community should have wide discretion in conducting research into commercial drones, software, and machine learning.

'Such a community would not only explore new uses for autonomy, counter-autonomy, and countering potential adversary autonomy, but also more realistically inform what the tactical advantages and vulnerabilities would be to both the U.S. and adversaries in adopting or adapting commercially available technology,' the report says.

The study advises intelligence agencies should 'raise the priority of collection and analysis of foreign autonomous systems.'

The study advises intelligence agencies should 'raise the priority of collection and analysis of foreign autonomous systems.'

'Such a program could also create options for insertion into current capabilities that might initially be too risky or too disruptive. 

'Some of the best sources for participation in this effort are the government laboratories, and independent, not-for-profit laboratories, including the FFRDCs and UARCs, because of both the technical proficiencies of their workforces and their working knowledge of national security missions. 

'Some of these individuals and organizations may have bridges to the commercial and academic sectors that can aid government programs.' 

This would also help systems learn to cope on their own. 

'Autonomous systems may have periods of time with limited or no communication capability; during those periods the system must reliably behave in known ways to the full range of stimuli that the system is designed for.'

The CSBA report says America is falling behind in the development of critical electromagnetic weapons some say could wipe out 90 percent of its population. Pictured is Boeing's Champ, or Counter-electronics High-powered microwave Advanced Missile Project, one of the  EMP weapons that is under construction

The CSBA report says America is falling behind in the development of critical electromagnetic weapons some say could wipe out 90 percent of its population. Pictured is Boeing's Champ, or Counter-electronics High-powered microwave Advanced Missile Project, one of the EMP weapons that is under construction

'Operators will have to change their mindset from expecting weapon systems that 'just work' out of the box to systems that require their time and effort into shaping their ever evolving instantiation, but will ultimately be better customized to their mission, style, and behaviors,' the report says.  

Previous reports have warned America is falling behind in the development of critical electromagnetic weapons some say could wipe out 90 percent of its population, a new report has claimed.

The Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments says the technology is 'one of the most critical operational domains in modern warfare.'

However, it concludes 'unfortunately, 'failed to keep pace' is an appropriate description of the Department of Defense's (DoD) investments in EMS warfare capabilities over the last generation.' 

HOW DOES EMP WORK? 

EMP, or electromagnetic pulse weapons use missiles equipped with an electromagnetic pulse cannon.

This uses a super-powerful microwave oven to generate a concentrated beam of energy.

The energy causes voltage surges in electronic equipment, rendering them useless before surge protectors have the chance to react.

The aim is to destroy an enemy's command, control, communication and computing, surveillance and intelligence capabilities without hurting people or infrastructure.

The report, 'Winning the Airwaves: Regaining America's Dominance in the Electromagnetic Spectrum', added the technology will become as revolutionary as smartphones.

'In the same way that smartphones and the Internet are redefining how the world shares, shops, learns, and works, the development and fielding of advanced sensors and networking technologies will enable militaries to gain significant new advantages over competitors that fail to keep pace,' it says.

It comes after controversial tech boss and presidential candidate John McAfee recently warned a 'doomsday' electronic weapon could wipe out 90 per cent of Americans and urged politicians to is the number one threat facing the country. 

McAfee, who recently announced he is running in 2016, wrote in a blog for International Business Times: 'Experts agree that an all out cyber attack, beginning with an EMP (electromagnetic pulse) attack on our electronic infrastructure, would wipe out 90% of the human population of this country within two years of the attack.

'That means the death of 270 million people within 24 months after the attack.'

The CSBA report says the Us has now lost its lead in the area.

'In the absence of a peer rival following the end of the Cold War, DoD failed to pursue a new generation of capabilities that are needed to maintain its EMS operational superiority. 

The missile is equipped with an electromagnetic pulse cannon. This uses a super-powerful microwave oven to generate a concentrated beam of energy. The energy causes voltage surges in electronic equipment, rendering them useless before surge protectors have the chance to react

The missile is equipped with an electromagnetic pulse cannon. This uses a super-powerful microwave oven to generate a concentrated beam of energy. The energy causes voltage surges in electronic equipment, rendering them useless before surge protectors have the chance to react

'This pause provided China, Russia, and other rivals with an opportunity to field systems that target vulnerabilities in sensor and communication networks the U.S. military has come to depend on.

'As a result, America's once significant military advantage in the EMS domain is eroding, and may in fact no longer exist.'

However, the report says the Us does have a chance to get back in front.

'This does not have to remain the case. 

'DoD now has the opportunity to develop new operational concepts and technologies that will allow it to 'leap ahead' of its competitors and create enduring advantages in EMS warfare.

It lays out several scenarios to develop drones and other devices to help combat EMS weapons. 

'The U.S. military could shift toward using unmanned vehicles or expendable payloads that emit low-power jamming noise in the radio frequency spectrum … or dazzling electro-optical / infrared sensors or narrowly focused radar beams to establish accurate targeting information for attacks,' the authors write.

They also say decoys could provoke the enemy to activate his fire-control radar and thereby reveal its position.

'In conclusion, the U.S. military gained significant advantages over its enemies in two previous shifts in the EMS competition: with radar and active countermeasures during World War II and with stealth technologies in the final years of the Cold War,' the report says.

'Our Nation's warfighters have another such opportunity today. 

'By adopting a new approach to EMS warfare and developing low-to-no power operational concepts and capabilities, the U.S. military could once again gain a significant edge over its future opponents.

The researchers said hi-tech drones could be developed to mitigate the threat of EMS weapons

The researchers said hi-tech drones could be developed to mitigate the threat of EMS weapons

'A failure to do so, however, could put America at risk of losing the battle for the airwaves.' 

From Ocean's Eleven to Star Trek, weapons that wipe out enemy electronics are a staple of science fiction films.

For years, scientists have been attempting to create such a weapon as part of Champ, or the Counter-electronics High-powered microwave Advanced Missile Project.

Now, the US Air Force claims it has advanced the technology, and says it can deploy it using the stealthy Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile-Extended Range (JASSM).

There are fears a well targeted attack could knock out multiple power stations. 

'This technology marks a new era in modern-day warfare,' said Keith Coleman, CHAMP program manager for Boeing Phantom Works. 

'In the near future, this technology may be used to render an enemy's electronic and data systems useless even before the first troops or aircraft arrive.'






According to Foxtrot Alpha, the weapons are almost ready for use.

Once integrated into JASSM, Champ will be a 'first day of war' standoff weapon it claims.

The report outlines how EMS weapons could be used in the battlefield, using decoys to confuse enemy weapons

The report outlines how EMS weapons could be used in the battlefield, using decoys to confuse enemy weapons

Because it can be launched by both bombers and fighters, Lockheed's Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile, or JASSM, is an ideal platform for Champ.

'The capability is real … and the technology can be available today,' said Major General Thomas Masiello, the Air Force Research Laboratory.

'That's an operational system already in our tactical air force'

In 2012, aircraft manufacturer Boeing successfully tested the weapon on a one-hour flight during which it knocked out the computers of an entire military compound.

During Boeing's experiment, the missile flew low over the Utah Test and Training Range, discharging electromagnetic pulses on to seven targets, permanently shutting down their electronics. 

Boeing said that the test was so successful even the camera recording it was disabled.

Although the project is shrouded in secrecy, experts believe the missile is equipped with an electromagnetic pulse cannon.

This uses a super-powerful microwave oven to generate a concentrated beam of energy which causes voltage surges in electronic equipment, rendering them useless before surge protectors have the chance to react. 

  




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